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UMass Amherst Libraries

NUTRITN 572 Community Nutrition

Resources to support the nutrition education projects

General Tips: Research Takes Time

One of the most important things is to give yourself adequate time to research the different types of information to better develop and present your project. You need to find information about your community organization and the resources available in your community. You need demographic data - about your community and possibly more broadly about folks affected by nutrition-related health issues. You need evidence-based research to support your project. 

This guide provides some suggestions for where & how to find these various types of information. If you struggle to find the right information for your project, don't hesitate to use the links in my profile box on the left to email me or to schedule an appointment!

Databases for Evidence-Based Nutrition Research

Look in these databases to find journal articles and evidence-based research about your topic. Research studies can provide various types of information about the issue.

A good tip when researching is to look at the reference section of sources you find useful. This may help aid your research by directing you to new and applicable sources you may not have found otherwise.

CRS Reports

Find CRS (Congressional Research Service) reports on current Nutrition topics using the ProQuest Congressional database.

TIP: Uncheck "Search All Content Types" and then check CRS reports so you only get these reports.

CRS Reports are written by Library of Congress librarians and subject matter experts for members of Congress about various issues. They can be useful in identifying federal-level initiatives about various health/nutrition issues and often include helpful reference lists.

In the News

Look at what is in the news. While most news articles may not be appropriate to cite, it may direct you to a study that was just released or conversations that occurring that are relevant to your topic.

New York Times Online
UMass Amherst Libraries have purchased access to the New York Times Academic Pass program for the UMass Amherst campus. To register for your academic account to the New York Times, you'll need a UMass Amherst email address. 

Follow the Registration instructions on our New York TImes Online guide to set up your account.