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Honors 201 - Social Movements

Getting started

Databases for Researching Social Movements

Secondary Sources

Primary sources, mostly historical

Contemporary Newspapers and News Sources

Citation Management

Use a citation manager, such as RefWorks or Zotero to keep track of your research.

Put all your references in one place, create quick and easy bibliographies, build your knowledgebase for the rest of your career. For help, check out the online guides and webinars or Ask a Librarian.

RefWorks

 

Spotlight on: W.E.B. Du Bois Papers & W.E.B. Du Bois Center

W.E.B. Du Bois Papers

Search and view correspondence, writings, and photographs in the W. E. B. Du Bois Papers online.

And/ or visit the Special Collections and University Archives department of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, located on the 25th floor. 

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., during the academic year, except major holidays.

During semester breaks, on certain holidays, and in the summer, Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) is open 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m

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W.E.B. Du Bois Center

Located on the 22nd floor of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library, the W. E. B. Du Bois Center was established in 2009 to engage the nation and the world in discussion and scholarship about the global issues involving race, labor and social justice.

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Spotlight on: Social change special collections at Du Bois Library

Social Change Primary Source Collections, 25th floor

Anti-war sit-in, Whitmore Hall, ca.1971

 

Anti-war sit-in, Whitmore Hall, ca.1971

 

Building upon the activist legacy of W.E.B. Du Bois, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) collects primary materials relating to individuals and groups devoted to the political, economic, spiritual, and social transformation of American society. The intent in taking such a broad collecting scope is to view social change as a totality, rather than as isolated movements and to document how ideas about one set of social issues informs other issues, and how social causes cross-pollinate, organizationally and conceptually. By preserving a record of these activities, SCUA makes it possible for future scholars, activists, and members of the community to continue to engage with the ideas that have motivated so many.

 

Although our interests extend to any endeavors that reflect the efforts of individuals and groups promote social change, the collections in SCUA provide particularly valuable documentation of the movements for peace, social justice, and racial equality, environmentalism, labor activism, intentional communities, and gay rights.